Landscapes

It is widely accepted that Joseph Nicephore Nièpce created the world's first photograph in 1826. View from Window at Gras is a grainy, monochromatic image of rooftops, revealing a faint horizon line in its muted distance. From this one image, photography celebrates the inauguration of its most revered subject, the landscape.

The natural connection between man, the camera and the landscape has been evolving ever since that 1826 heliography. Artists after artists have added their contribution of ideas and perspectives the image of the landscape, creating some of the most inspiring works we have viewed. Ansel Adams profoundly documented the majestic Yosemite Valley, and Edward Weston transformed our experience of the rocks, sea and coast at Point Lobos.

Weingarten's work embraces bits and pieces of this heritage, absorbed by an artist who has a passion for the land and nature he works with.

Robert Weingarten interprets landscape as a collage of color and form, creating the distilled imagery that is uniquely his own. His sense of color seems to be derived from the painter's palette. Soft blends tint timeless Renaissance skies. Brightly saturated hues accent the images with sensitive precision.

Robert sees in ways that capture the beautiful, accentuate the form and leave us with a curiosity to gaze more purposefully at the world around us. - Dennis High, Curator

Mist on St. Quirico II

Abraye De Senanque

Palouse Pattern #27

St. Quirico Early Morning

Lavender Field and Lone Tree

Autumn Canopy

Palouse Pattern #12 (Homage to Hopper)

Palouse Pattern #24

View of Berkshire

Scottish Morning 1 (Scotland)

Palouse Pattern #14

North of Valensole

Mist Rising at El Capitan

Trees in Brush Fire (Aspen)

Rainy Evening at the Met

Prague at Dawn (Czech Republic)

Golden Bridge (Czech Republic)

Monet's Dining Room

Kona Impressions

Water Lilies

Dancing Trees

Geometric Lavender and Barley

 

Morning Vineyards

Lone Tree (Tuscany)

Winterpath (Aspen)